FAQ’s

Understanding Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (7)

We define a workplace as anywhere where a service is carried out by one person for another person in exchange for money.

This includes:

  • Your day-to-day work environment, such as: an office, warehouse, garage, shop, grounds, site, etc;
  • An off-site location where work is carried out, such as: an interview in a coffee shop, a construction site, an out-of-office client meeting;
  • Travel-related work sites, such as: a conference, training seminar, lecture, or other event.
  • Official work-related social events, such as: a Christmas party, a team-building day out, a work dinner.

As a first step, you can check out our “What is Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” pages. After this, you can fill out the submission form on our website. We will then review your submission and verify whether your case meets our internal and community guidelines. We will then publish your Report and send you a guide on what to do about sexual harassment.

After that we can help you, if you wish, to file the case with your HR department and/or the EEOC; to discuss and resolve the case with your employer; and to get legal, HR, therapeutic, or other help or advice.

Yes, it can be. However, for the purpose of our platform we publish and deal with incidents that involve sexual conduct as a form of harassment. This may go along with gender/sexuality-based discrimination but currently we do not publish cases of gender/sexuality-based discrimination in isolation.

For a comprehensive answer to this question, please see our “What is Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” pages.

No, sexual harassment can be perpetrated by anyone, including members of the same sex or gender identity as you.

No, sexual harassment can be perpetrated by anyone, including someone who is your junior or someone who reports to you.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) defines sexual harassment as:

“Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.”

Sexual harassment falls into two general categories: 1) quid-pro-quo: this is where the giving or removal of employment benefits is implicitly or explicitly offered in exchange for sexual favours or conduct. 2) hostile environments: this is where the sexual conduct is so pervasive and severe so as to causes a person’s work environment to be intimidating, hostile, or offensive; or to affect their ability to do their job properly.

For a comprehensive answer to this question, please see our “What is Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” pages.

If you have been sexually harassed by a work colleague outside of the workplace then you should contact us directly and we can advise you: reports@beonalert.org

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Understanding Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (7)

We define a workplace as anywhere where a service is carried out by one person for another person in exchange for money.

This includes:

  • Your day-to-day work environment, such as: an office, warehouse, garage, shop, grounds, site, etc;
  • An off-site location where work is carried out, such as: an interview in a coffee shop, a construction site, an out-of-office client meeting;
  • Travel-related work sites, such as: a conference, training seminar, lecture, or other event.
  • Official work-related social events, such as: a Christmas party, a team-building day out, a work dinner.

As a first step, you can check out our “What is Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” pages. After this, you can fill out the submission form on our website. We will then review your submission and verify whether your case meets our internal and community guidelines. We will then publish your Report and send you a guide on what to do about sexual harassment.

After that we can help you, if you wish, to file the case with your HR department and/or the EEOC; to discuss and resolve the case with your employer; and to get legal, HR, therapeutic, or other help or advice.

Yes, it can be. However, for the purpose of our platform we publish and deal with incidents that involve sexual conduct as a form of harassment. This may go along with gender/sexuality-based discrimination but currently we do not publish cases of gender/sexuality-based discrimination in isolation.

For a comprehensive answer to this question, please see our “What is Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” pages.

No, sexual harassment can be perpetrated by anyone, including members of the same sex or gender identity as you.

No, sexual harassment can be perpetrated by anyone, including someone who is your junior or someone who reports to you.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) defines sexual harassment as:

“Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.”

Sexual harassment falls into two general categories: 1) quid-pro-quo: this is where the giving or removal of employment benefits is implicitly or explicitly offered in exchange for sexual favours or conduct. 2) hostile environments: this is where the sexual conduct is so pervasive and severe so as to causes a person’s work environment to be intimidating, hostile, or offensive; or to affect their ability to do their job properly.

For a comprehensive answer to this question, please see our “What is Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” pages.

If you have been sexually harassed by a work colleague outside of the workplace then you should contact us directly and we can advise you: reports@beonalert.org

Load More